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Perspectives on Community-Campus Collaboration

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By Mona Liu 20 Apr, 2017

We’re pleased to announce that C2UExpo 2017 is the first ever event to be certified for #Sustainability through SFU’s Sustainability Office!

As a #C2UExpo project assistant, I’m proud to introduce you to some of the sustainable practices that you’ll see at the conference and at SFU, as well some measures you can take to stay sustainable.

By Team #C2UExpo 19 Apr, 2017
Photo taken from  http://harthouse.ca
By Team #C2UExpo 19 Apr, 2017

A program that focuses on hiring individuals with barriers to traditional means of employment to work during the C2UExpo conference? Yes, please! Meet Rachel Nelson, head of the C2UExpo Community Ambassadors Committee delegation, and the the delegation team: Landon Hoyt – Hastings Crossing BIA; Anna Migicovsky – Potluck Café; Darren Mumford – YMCA; Njeri Kontulahti – Vancity; Stephani Pritchard- WorkBC; and Stephen Dooley – SFU Surrey.

Rachel and her delegation have modeled an inclusive approach and recruited people who are facing barriers to employment to play a vital role during the C2UExpo conference. Community Ambassadors will work in various areas, such as logistical support, documentation, volunteer coordinators, and much more!

By Team #C2UExpo 03 Mar, 2017

Why a new brand

It’s very important to us that C2UExpo is a movement that featurescommunity and academics in equal numbers and as partners. This conference will be friendly, engaging and inviting and we wanted our brand to reflect these qualities. Our sessions won’t be traditional and formal, so why would our visual brand be?

How

We worked with SFU’s in-house creative team to achieve a look and feel. The goal was to have visuals that feel friendly and invite the viewer to engage and connect with the content. You’ll notice it across our web, email, print and social communications channels.

What

Here are some examples of our new visual identity online.

By Team #C2UExpo 24 Jan, 2017

2017 promises to be an exciting year for connecting efforts and consolidating a long-term vision, and collaborative action plan for the national community-campus engagement (CCE) movement in Canada. C2UExpo 2017’s timing to serve as a convening space and major catalyst for the movement is excellent. 2017 is not only Canada’s 150th Anniversary but there is increasing local, national and global momentum for increasing higher education’s role in public engagement,

I have been involved with the CUExpo movement and conferences beginning in 2008 at UVic as the Program coordinator and then in the 2011, 2013, and 2015 conferences, also as staff support with Community-Based Research Canada (CBRC) www.communityresearchcanada.ca . For the 2017 conference @ SFU, I am involved in the International Coordinating Ctte and supporting the Program Ctte and the Pre-Conference jams in my new role as the national Community Co-Lead for the Aligning Institutions Working Group (AICI), part of the SSHRC-funded, Community First Impacts of Community Engagement (CFICE) (2012-2019) project. https://carleton.ca/communityfirst/ . CFICE is aligning its efforts with the SFU team and with other key networks such as CBRC to scale up and galvanize our national effort.

The AICI, informed by a nationally-based working group and overall CFICE Steering Ctte is focused on 3 main activities for 2017-2019: First, we will create a made-in-Canada classification system to assess and strategically plan for ‘Community First’ community-campus engagement, informed by the NCCPE’s EDGE Tool in the UK and the Carnegie Classifications System in the US. Second, we will identify funding and develop enabling policies to support all actors involved in CCE (from community partners, to brokers, students, and faculty). And third, we will create an inventory map of campus engagement entities, offices and initiatives across the country (beginning with universities, but eventually expanding to colleges).

As part of the larger national policy and action movement we also plan to build off of an 11 point Action Plan which Ted Jackson, retired Carleton University Professor and the original Principal Investigator (PI) of the CFICE Project, created after the pre-conference sessions at the last C2UEXPO2015 in Ottawa.  Titled Accelerating Change: Policy Innovation through and for Community-Campus Engagement, this document remains timely and in the coming months the AICI Working Group will explore how best to use it as a springboard, especially leading up to and including C2UEXPO2017 events. Here are excerpts from the plan: 

Introduction

On May 25, 2015, at Carleton University, 30 leaders and innovators in the field of community-campus partnerships developed a set of actions aimed at accelerating policy change in the eco-system for community engagement in Canada. A subsequent workshop on May 26, 2015 at Algonquin College on the policy impacts of community-based research organized by Community-Based Research Canada took the conversation further. Based on these deliberations, the following action plan is proposed for the next two years:

OVER THE NEXT YEAR (2015-2016)

1)     Policy dialogue on public and community engagement with and among provincial governments, federal government agencies, and CUE leaders

2)     Research and policy analysis on the hidden costs of multiple layers of accountability a ssociated with university-managed federal research grants.

3)     Research and policy analysis on ways and means of reducing the transaction costs to community organizations and non-profits in participating in community-campus partnerships

4)     Ongoing consultation, research and policy analysis on the impacts of CBR in the humanities and social sciences

5)     Building and disseminating a database of stories of the impacts of CBR, CSL and other forms of partnership

6)     Collecting and posting the various models for incentivising universities and individual faculty members for doing effective, sustained partnership work

7)     Building the case for mobilizing funds for non-traditional (non-academic) research chairs

OVER THE NEXT TWO YEARS (2015-2017)

8)     Organize a Biz-Gov-CUE roundtable involving the Canadian Council of Executives, government officials, key CUE associations and networks, on the policy impacts of CUE

9)     Design, fundraise for and establish a pan-Canadian coordinating centre for public and community engagement that would carry out research and education, and support PSE institutions, non-profit organizations and governments in building and applying effective public engagement capacity

10) Design, fundraise for and establish a grant-making fund to support non-profits, associations and social movements to initiate and co-direct community-campus partnerships in research, education and other areas

11) Carry out detailed research on the results of cases in which universities and colleges have used their investment capital to co-create hard assets in the community

AICI will work with its broader Working Group, Advisory and other collaborators to ensure the process of engagement and ownership of a broad-based action plan in Canada, inspired by the Accelerating Change document and others (which we are sure to find and create!), happens. It is not an easy thing to effect any kind of national action-focused collaborative in a country as vast and complex as Canada. However, higher education in Canada, as in many parts of the world, remains a vital public space for innovation and provides place(s) for engagement. Universities and colleges serve a unique role in society – and ideally, support the co-creation and/or facilitation of interdisciplinary solutions to the most pressing issues of our times (such as the Truth and Reconciliation’s Commission of Canada’s Call to Action), with multi-sector societal partners, researchers, teachers and students. With C2UEXPO2017, CFICE and a wide range of national funders and bodies can now work together (more than ever before), to creatively seed a national collaborative that systematically supports and incentivizes institutions of higher education to be democratic, accountable, relevant and responsive – to serve the common good.

By Team #C2UExpo 11 Jan, 2017
Many educators would agree that social innovation must happen through meaningful community engagement but may not be certain of the practical steps to take when designing programs to meet this goal. Stanford University examined their own work and the offerings of other social impact educators, and gleaned four lessons other educators might find useful. Click here for full article.
By Team #C2UExpo 10 Jan, 2017
Are you involved with an exciting community-campus partnership?  Are you a faculty, staff member or student working with community groups to bring about positive change?  Are you currently researching pressing issues facing society and about to take the next step to make your project a reality?  Are you part of a community working on a project with a post-secondary institution? We want to hear from you!

Submit your story to be shared on the C2U Expo blog.  Send an email to  blog@c2uexpo.ca  

By Team #C2UExpo 03 Jan, 2017
Watch this video  to hear Janet Moore and Duane Elverum describe how students of the future will “make the course instead of take the course” via innovative project hubs, much like CityStudio in Vancouver, BC. Recorded at TEDxVancouver on November 14, 2015.

CityStudio is a collaboration between the City of Vancouver and its universities and colleges. This experimentation and innovation hub launches projects on the ground that are co-created by staff, students and community members.


By Team #C2UExpo 23 Dec, 2016

When the first crop is harvested in the  Project Growing North  greenhouse in Naujaat, Nunavut this spring, no one will be cheering louder than Stefany Nieto.

Nieto, a fourth-year student at the Ted Rogers School of Management, is the co-project manager, along with fellow TRSM student Ben Canning, of Project Growing North, an  Enactus Ryerson  initiative that has raised funds and provided labour to build a greenhouse that will provide fresh vegetables to this isolated northern community at a reasonable cost. The greenhouse was finished this month and planting will begin in March.

Project Growing North addresses both food insecurity and health issues for the people in the Hudson Bay hamlet of Naujaat, population 1,000. Generally, residents of Northern communities pay an average of four times the price that Ontarians pay for vegetables and herbs. Given the frigid temperatures much of the year, Naujaat residents have been unable to grow their own produce – until now.

The idea of a greenhouse was conceived through consultations with local residents, and Nieto says the only way such a project can be sustainable “is if the community embraces it.”

For the full article from Ryerson University click here .

By Team #C2UExpo 22 Dec, 2016

Sober Stay, a roommate-finder for those transitioning out of rehabilitation and returning to the community, is among several community health solutions that students in SFU’s Health Change Lab conceived over the past semester.

The Health Change Lab is a seven-credit course in which students work together in teams to understand local social and health challenges, and devise projects to potentially resolve them.

Students shared their ideas this week during a course windup at Surrey City Hall. They hope their efforts may eventually lead to resources for some of the community’s most pressing social issues.

S ober Stay  grew from one student team’s initial goal to develop a general resource website for those completing rehabilitation and moving back into the community.

The team spent several weeks interviewing community and health workers locally as well as in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, where they also met with residents.

“It was powerful to meet with individuals who candidly shared what it’s like to return to the community with fresh hopes,” says Joanna Seow, a student in SFU’s Beedie School of Business, whose team included students Sophia Lam, Lana Friesen and James Wang.

“But while we began with a general website in mind, it became clear that the most basic need was for a supportive and encouraging environment. And we thought, who better to support and encourage than someone who has been in the same shoes?”

The students were also inspired by what they learned from the John Volken Academy, which provides an affordable residential addiction recovery and treatment program along with support for cultivating self-worth and developing job skills.

“We saw that housing that was not merely a place in any neighbourhood, but rather something that ultimately reinforced their sobriety. We created  Sober Stay  with continual recovery in mind.”

Sober Stay   is one of a slate of solutions students conceived. Other teams focused on food security, transportation for seniors, and mental health and substance use among youth. Another team conceived a First Nations cultural competency educational initiative for schools.

The Health Change Lab was developed by SFU’s Beedie School of Business’ RADIUS social innovation lab and the Faculty of Health Sciences, partnering with the City of Surrey and Fraser Health.

For the full article, please visit the SFU News .

More Posts
By Mona Liu 20 Apr, 2017

We’re pleased to announce that C2UExpo 2017 is the first ever event to be certified for #Sustainability through SFU’s Sustainability Office!

As a #C2UExpo project assistant, I’m proud to introduce you to some of the sustainable practices that you’ll see at the conference and at SFU, as well some measures you can take to stay sustainable.

By Team #C2UExpo 19 Apr, 2017
Photo taken from  http://harthouse.ca
By Team #C2UExpo 19 Apr, 2017

A program that focuses on hiring individuals with barriers to traditional means of employment to work during the C2UExpo conference? Yes, please! Meet Rachel Nelson, head of the C2UExpo Community Ambassadors Committee delegation, and the the delegation team: Landon Hoyt – Hastings Crossing BIA; Anna Migicovsky – Potluck Café; Darren Mumford – YMCA; Njeri Kontulahti – Vancity; Stephani Pritchard- WorkBC; and Stephen Dooley – SFU Surrey.

Rachel and her delegation have modeled an inclusive approach and recruited people who are facing barriers to employment to play a vital role during the C2UExpo conference. Community Ambassadors will work in various areas, such as logistical support, documentation, volunteer coordinators, and much more!

More Posts
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